2018 – the year of the big think

juggler3sI have reached a point at which I feel the need for an assessment of what I’m doing, why, and of what I want to do.  Amongst other things the work I’m making at present is too slow to keep up with my ideas, and that is having a dampening effect on the excitement of those ideas.  The stitching element is taking up time which I want to devote to print making.  And I still have vague ideas of trying out three dimensional work, somehow.

critics1I now think I want to eschew external influences which are constraining.  I’m giving up thinking that my work fails because it does not fit into a size category, for instance.  Indeed I don’t want to think of being in any category at all.

juggling1I think.  Well, I have quite a bit to think about.  I am certainly not thinking about giving up working in some way; it is an essential part of living as far as I’m concerned.  But I have vaguely thought about giving up this and the Threading thoughts blogs.  As I say, it is to be a Year of Big Thinking.

Second bite of the cherry

Seduction comes in many guises.  I am seduced by books, for instance, but they largely reward the desire which they arouse.  There are many more questionable enticements, however, and one such for me is the promise of organisation.  This originally came in the form of stationery, and indeed I still find notebooks, pencils, pens, filing methods, etc. seductive.  Now there is the added enticement of a nice shiny new blog with which to organise my work.

But each method of organisation has to fit its circumstances; what is for private consumption and what can also work publically – especially when the public is widespread and largely unknown.  Realisation of this quickly led me to close this blog from public view while I tried to sort out my thoughts – organisation needs to be organised!  Now, however, I am ready to try again, to see where this can go.

SAQA SquareThe subject of this first post of the reopened blog is my recent donation to this year’s SAQA Benefit Auction. Size matters very particularly in this case, as the donated quilted piece has to be 12″x 12″.  I find it difficult to work exactly to size.  I miss out on many – maybe even most – exhibitions because my work is either too small or in one case too big for the entrance criteria.  I have donated squares previously by cutting down larger printed pieces which as luck would have it were not working for my own purposes.  But with no such ‘mistakes’ of which to take advantage, no donations were made for a couple of years.

Then, I was sorting through my remaining small stash of bought fabrics and came across a little piece of shiny madras cotton, bought many years ago in New Hampshire – another result of seduction: I had originally gone in to buy wool, and I came out with far more than planned!  Looking at the colours it struck me that they would not only complement this piece, but that for once this was a piece which could stand – perhaps even be enhanced by a border.  It so happened that the proportions, everything worked out so that I was happy with the look, and so serendipity has led to another donation to SAQA.

 

 

Organisation – a good place to revisit

What I produce has a tendency to get out of hand because so many balls are in the air at the same time – that’s obviously one of the reasons I am attracted to the juggler image.  The consequence of this is that elements slip through the cracks of progress.  Designs lurk in their digital files for years, ideas are not noted and thus fade into lost memories, and work can float in limbo at an interim stage.

finishNow that I am attempting to keep track of my workings through this blog I must likewise look at means to organise my time.  Over the past year or so I have stitched many silk pieces, but have not finished them all.  I know why this has happened: I am working on a very large quilt which is taking months of work, and sometimes I want a break in order to finish something quickly (or at least less slowly!).  But as soon as the small piece is complete as far as stitching goes, I return to the big quilt.  Meantime the divan in my sewing room is accumulating too many layers of pendings.  I can feel the need for a timetable and discipline.

In my salaried career I responded well to an element of self-imposed discipline.  I prefer to work with lists with priorities and short-term deadlines, thus separating the balls which I’m juggling.  It means relaxed concentration on whatever I have to hand because I know at the back of my mind that I’ve accounted for everything else.  Sometimes of course life gets in the way, or the system needs revisiting – or, as I feel now, the whole edifice needs a good sort-out.